English Language

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A Lot Vs. Allot

A Lot Vs. Allot

A lot (meaning more than a few) is always two words. The phrase is often misspelled as alot. Allot is a verb that means to distribute by lot or shares. Read More
Accept Vs. Except

Accept Vs. Except

Accept means to receive, or agree with; Except means to omit or to exempt. The two are commonly misused and often interchanged at little cost to standard usage. Read More
Affect Vs. Effect

Affect Vs. Effect

Affect & Effect are two highly misused and interchanged terms. As a verb affect means to influence. Effect as a verb means to cause but as a noun means result. Read More
All Right Is Not Alright

All Right Is Not Alright

All right is always two words. Alright is not a word, although like altogether and already it looks like is should be and spellchecks are strangely allowing it. Read More

Brouhaha

Brouhaha (Noun). An uproar, a hubbub, excited public event, turmoil, or social agitation. Usually over a minor incident. Read More

Crepuscular

A crepuscular animal is mostly active during twilight, which is at both dusk and dawn. House cats, bats, bears & ocelots are an examples of crepuscular animals. Read More

Em Dash Vs En Dash

An em dash is slightly longer than an en dash and both are longer than any old hyphen or minus symbol. Typically the em dash is used like a comma. Read More

Gubernatorial

Gubernatorial is the adjective used when referring to a governor. If Arnold Schwartzenneger was on the beach, you could say gubernatorial swim trunks. Read More
It's vs. Its

It's vs. Its

It's and Its are often misused and confused in written English. It's means it is while its is the possessive pronoun meaning something belongs to something. Read More

Landlubbers

A landlubber is someone who has no knowledge of boats or the sea. Lubber (noun) referring to a clumsy, lazy, or all around inexperienced person with boats. Read More
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